SMOCK AESTHETICS: NO IMPROVEMENT.

By Nii B. Andrews.

Over a year ago we attempted to push back against a less than desirable trend with respect to the aesthetics of our Ghanaian smock.

Our continued informal monitoring has not yielded any evidence of improvement.

Hopefully, we have not reached yet another point of no return.

Northern Ghanaian dignitaries showing the true aesthetic.

Early this week as I turned left at the end of the dual carriageway that takes me to the hospital, I saw two gentlemen (and I use the term advisedly) standing under the row of flamboyant trees now in full bloom.

There they were, wearing black pants/trousers in the morning with black shoes and both of them had on smocks that barely reached below their trouser belts!

No comment.

I would have stopped to issue them with summonses but since a surgical operation was scheduled for that morning, to arrive at the hospital with frayed nerves needed to be avoided at all cost.

My patience is for my patients.

Malcolm X shows the right way in Accra.

So, I limited myself to a few barely audible imprecations without any hand gestures.

But what is it about us that makes us so destructive? Does anybody know?

Why do we destroy everything within reach; our rivers, streams, lagoons, beaches, forests, trees, neighborhoods, wildlife; our culture – language, food, clothing; our educational system; our health system; our police service; our currency….?

JDM- former POTROG, shows how.

Currently, there is also a subtle but easily discernible assault on our vaunted kente cloth; strange patterns have started appearing.

We are monitoring this closely with apprehension. Meehn; it is a full time job!

Simple piece of advice; if you wear a smock, make sure that it is long enough to cover your derriere; and long enough to reach at least past your arm’s length when your arm is held straight down by your side.

JDM again.

 

It is that simple.

Do we want to ruin that too?

What a country!

1 thought on “SMOCK AESTHETICS: NO IMPROVEMENT.”

  1. I laughed out loud at “my patience is for your patients.”
    The Batakari trend is something I observed as well, thanks for throwing light unto this issue.

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